More Information About Reattaching the Rearview Mirror

One of the most irritating occurrences for a driver is to lose their rear view mirror. Not lost exactly, just that it is no longer attached to the windshield. Besides being illegal and unsafe, not having a rear view mirror is a serious inconvenience to a driver. The good news is it is fairly easy and inexpensive to reattach the mirror.

The first thing to do is get all of your necessary supplies ready. A quick trip to the auto parts store will do nicely. Pick up a rearview mirror adhesive kit. It will have a strong glue vial and a supply of accelerant to speed up the glue curing process.

A small Allen wrench and thin, razorblade scraper will be helpful as well. Get together some odds and ends from the house too. Masking tape and, if the weather is chilly, a hair dryer or heat gun will be helpful.

Now that everything is ready it’s time to reattach the mirror. It’s a good idea to leave the car’s windows down during the process. The fumes from the glue can be a little overwhelming.

Use the scraper to remove any old glue from the windshield. Allowing the car windshield to warm up in the sun or warming the glass with the hair dryer or heat gun will loosen it as well.

It is usually pretty obvious where the rearview mirror should be placed due to residue from the original mirror. However if that is not the case use your tape measure to mark a place halfway across the windshield and about 4 inches from the headliner.

Make sure the area of glass that is to be home to your rearview mirror is clean of the old glue and dirt or oil. The base plate of mirror should be scraped and clean of residue as well. The old glue will prohibit the new adhesion from sticking properly.

The next step is to place the rearview mirror. Using the glue from the kit, apply an adequate amount to the clean glass. Remove the mounting base from the mirror with the Allen wrench.

Working with the mirror attached is cumbersome and awkward. Apply the accelerant to the base plate and allow the accelerant time to dry. Both surfaces are now prepped for adhesion.

You’re almost there. Liberally apply the glue to the back of the base plate and firmly press it onto the prepared spot on the inside of the windshield. Be sure to hold it in place for at least two minutes.

The base plate should be left alone for a 15-minute minimum and longer is even better. If it is convenient letting the adhesive cure overnight is an excellent idea.

After the base plate has had adequate time to dry, rescrew the mirror to its base. Don’t be tempted to test the hold and pull on the rearview mirror. It will hold just fine as it is and with any luck, the job will last for the life of the car.

You Should Carefully When Choose A Collision Repair Center

After a fender bender, it’s just as smart to steer yourself into the hands of the right auto body collision repair center as it is to check out a contractor’s credentials when you need home repair.

With more than 35,000 auto body repair shops nationwide, choosing a shop can be confusing.

Steve Cox, vice president of the Council of Better Business Bureaus (CBBB), says, “Although an insurance company may make some recommendations, drivers ultimately are responsible for selecting an auto body repair shop. Choosing a trustworthy, quality-oriented shop is very important for ensuring the best possible results.”

The CBBB and the National Auto Body Council (NABC) have teamed up to help consumers better manage the collision
repair experience, with tips on choosing a trustworthy shop, saving money on a replacement rental car and knowing how to settle any disputes.

Choose a Trustworthy Collision Repair Shop. Check out the shop’s qualifications by asking about advanced technician training from a national organization such as the Inter-Industry Conference on Auto Collision Repair (I-CAR) or National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certification.

Look for Commitment to Customer Satisfaction. Ask whether the shop is a member of the Better Business Bureau and verify information on the BBB Web site at www.bbb.org to see if the shop maintains a good reputation.

Arrange a Replacement Rental Car. Since the average car is in the repair shop for two weeks, ask if the shop can make recommendations for a rental car company and if it can arrange for a replacement rental car to be ready when you drop off your car. If your auto insurance policy includes replacement rental car coverage, which is usually only a couple dollars a month, you may get a rental car for little or no money.

Get Everything in Writing Up Front. Get a written repair and price estimate of the work to be performed, as well as an explanation of why specific recommendations are necessary to correct the collision damage, before the job begins. Also, ask about a warranty. Professional, reputable repair shops will stand behind their repair work by offering a warranty.

When You Lose The Right To Repair

When deciding where to have their car repaired or serviced, most people choose a repair shop they trust and one that’s convenient to their home or work, so they can fit such visits into their already busy schedules.

Most people assume they will always be able to choose where their cars are repaired, but that may not always be the case.

Cars are run by computers and car manufacturers don’t always want to release the computer codes that are required for anyone to determine what is wrong with a car, and the necessary information for the shop to properly complete the repair.

Without these codes, independent repair shops may not be able to compete and car owners may have to bring their cars to the dealership, no matter how far away it is or how much it costs.

There are nearly 225 million vehicles in the U.S. and only 21,640 car dealerships. In addition, there are 132,000 businesses that repair cars for a living. Without access to the computer codes they need, such repair shops would eventually be forced out of business because there will be fewer and fewer repairs on an automobile that they can fix.

Some members of Congress understand the implications of this problem and are working to pass the Motor Vehicle Owners Right To Repair Act.

The bill would require the car companies to share the same information and tools with independent repair shops that they provide car dealers, while protecting the car companies’ trade secrets.

If the thought of only being able to take your car to a dealership causes concern, you may want to discuss this proposed legislation with your elected officials.

Lobbyists for large car companies and new car dealers have been very vocal about how this bill would affect them. Last year, the act had 100 Congressional supporters, but Congress did not pass the bill before it adjourned.

“If the driving public does not speak up, they may lose the right to choose where to have their vehicles serviced and repaired,” said Kathleen Schmatz, president and CEO of the Automotive Aftermarket Industry Association. “Something as simple as sending a letter to one’s Congressional representatives would have great impact.”